Developing Comic Further – Environment, Characters and Panels

Playroom

The previous post on this comic idea had some sketched hints at the ‘playroom’ kind of aesthetic I wanted for the bedroom, so I thought to try working on some different angles/compositions/framing for panels that would give the reader the impression that the wall was in fact being projected on to, and that the images on the walls are moving animations.  I keep coming back to the Rugrats, but in particular, those scenes where we are seeing the world through Spike’s eyes – all distorted with fish-eye aspects.  I can’t find any examples online, but it’s quite a nightmarish viewpoint.  Add the playroom from Akira into this, along with that age-old futuristic ideal of images everywhere*, and I’ll arrive at something scary/recognisable/cute in time enough.

This isn’t the bit I mean at all, but I can’t find any images of the playroom online either. I think it’s the ominous lighting in the fight scene with Tetsuo that has me referencing it more than anything, though, so this image will more than suffice.

*A fine passage from Cybersexualies essay Technophilia, by Mary Ann Doane, refers to the impressive amount of imagery in science fiction (though it certainly isn’t something we’re unfamiliar with in every day life):

‘Garrett Stewart remarks on the over-abundance of viewing screens and viewing machines in science fiction in general – of ‘banks of monitors, outsized video intercoms, x-ray display panels, hologram tubes, backlit photoscopes, aerial overhead projectors, slide screens, radar scopes, whole curved walls of transmitted imagery, the retinal registers of unseen electronic eyes.’  And in his view, ‘cinema becomes a synecdoche for the entire technics of an imagined society.’ (30)

It seems like having this ultra-‘natural’ scene projected onto the bedroom walls will be quite an obvious illustration of the use of technology to create a new, ultra-human, and un-Other-based environment, a central theme in my dissertation.  Having the child in the scene playing with a tablet-type device feels a little lazy, but I was also aware of the importance of including very recognisable technologies in order for the story to be relatable; tablets are pretty ubiquitous right now.  Here are some goofay designs:

Gaming2

Gaming

Struggling at the minute to decide what language the child is learning on the device – if I choose Japanese, I’m giving myself an opportunity to practice my own learning, but I am aware and wary of the whole Orientalism cliche in so much science fiction… We’ll see.

I am having some trouble deciding on what the two characters (mother and child) should look like too.  Every time I make a conscious effort to draw a person, a character that I have made up, I suddenly find myself drawing hideous, hideous faces, the kind of which I’d never draw when I’m just doodling, and drawing faces for my own enjoyment.  At the same time, if I try looking at other comic artists whose work I love, I’ll copy them, and then hate myself for being that unimaginative, that lazy.  The only real solution to this problem is to keep drawing every day (as absolutely everyone advises), and eventually the brain-to-wrist connections will get stronger.  This is what I got from this recent exercise:

GrossKiddo

Kiddo

Madre

Rockabye

So, that’ll be something to push harder on tonight, and hope that the aesthetic comes out when I have at these (more definite) panels in the next few days/weeks:

Comic4

Child comes into room after following baby’s cries, and sees mother-robot breastfeeding little baby sibling.

Comic5

Comic7

Snaps out of that. Mother-robot comes over to pick child up, child has knife, slices open veil (onto which the image of mother’s head is being projected)

This is another fantasy/dream sequence, and when it finishes (with a detailed image of the mechanical head under the veil), the child goes back to their playroom and is happy when greeted by its tablet.

While at home in Northern Ireland for three weeks, I’ll use this time to draw out the comic, in black-and-white – probably using ink and a paint brush, potentially working in fineliner – once I know what I want it to look like/which tool I can use more skillfully, that decision will make itself.

Comic Cover

I have been working on cover ideas, using many different colours for the face in the mother-robot’s veil, similar to the work of two artists I came across in the last few months, who use colour with bold, electric energy:

And someone who goes by the handle 8 9 3 9

Less half-clothed ladies for half-clothed ladies’ sake though.  Also looking closely at the colour palette of Wesley Allbrook’s comics, particularly the pink-pink of Montmartre à trois.  She’s incredible.

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